Animal Welfare Reconsidered - special open access issue of the journal Animal Welfare – University of Copenhagen

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04 February 2019

Animal Welfare Reconsidered - special open access issue of the journal Animal Welfare

Animal Welfare - special issue

This special issue of Animal Welfare, Vol 28, No. 1, February 2019, published by Universities Federation for Animal Welfare (UFAW), is edited by D. M. Weary, P. Sandøe, & M. C. Appleby. The papers all provide critical reflection on topics relevant to animal welfare. Animal welfare is conceptually challenging and methodologically vexatious, and any changes required to improve animal welfare are often difficult to implement. For all these reasons there is a need for critical reflection among people studying or aiming to improve the welfare of animals in human care.

Introduction and overview

Animal welfare reconsidered (pdf)
By D. M. Weary, P. Sandøe, & M. C. Appleby

Contents

What do animals want? (URL)
By B. Franks

Animal agency, animal awareness and animal welfare (URL)
By M. Špinka

Is boredom an animal welfare concern? (URL)
By R. K. Meagher

Understanding the multiple conceptions of animal welfare (URL)
By D. M. Weary &  J. A. Robbins

Can biomarkers of biological age be used to assess cumulative lifetime experience? (URL)
By M. Bateson & C. Poirier

How happy is your pet? The Problem of subjectivity in the assessment of companion animal welfare (URL)
By J. A. Serpell

Aggregating animal welfare indicators: can it be done in a transparent and ethically robust way? (URL)
By P. Sandøe, S. A. Corr, T. B. Lund & B. Forkman

Assessing animal welfare at the farm level: do we care sufficiently about the individual? (URL)
By C. Winckler

We demand compromise: which achieves more, asking for small or large changes? (URL)
By M. C. Appleby

How best to improve farm animal welfare? Four main approaches viewed from an economic perspective (URL)
By T. Christensen, S. Denver & P. Sandøe

How our approaches to assessing benefits and harms can be improved (URL)
By E. S. Sena & G. L. Currie